Scientists show how salt lowers reaction temperatures to make novel materials

phys.org | 4/19/2018 | Staff
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A dash of salt can simplify the creation of two-dimensional materials, and thanks to Rice University scientists, the reason is becoming clear.

Boris Yakobson, a Rice professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of chemistry, was the go-to expert when a group of labs in Singapore, China, Japan and Taiwan used salt to make a "library" of 2-D materials that combined transition metals and chalcogens.

Compounds - Transistors - Photovoltaics - Sensors - Catalysts

These compounds could lead to smaller and faster transistors, photovoltaics, sensors and catalysts, according to the researchers.

Through first-principle molecular dynamics simulations and accurate energy computations, Yakobson and his colleagues determined that salt reduces the temperature at which some elements interact in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. That makes it easier to form atom-thick layers similar to graphene but with the potential to customize their chemical composition for specific layer-material and accordingly electrical, optical, catalytic and other useful properties.

Research - Team - Yakobson - Rice - Researcher

The research team including Yakobson and Rice postdoctoral researcher Yu Xie and graduate student Jincheng Lei reported its results this week in Nature.

The team led by Zheng Liu of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore used its seasoned technique with CVD to create 47 compounds of metal chalcogenides (which contain a chalcogenand an electropositive metal). Most of the new compounds had two ingredients, but some were alloys of three, four and even five. Many of the materials had been imagined and even coveted, Yakobson said, but never made.

CVD - Process - Atoms - Temperatures—in - Case

In the CVD process, atoms excited by temperatures—in this case between 600 and 850 degrees Celsius (1,112 and 1,562 degrees Fahrenheit)—form a gas and ultimately settle on a substrate, linking to atoms of complementary chemistry to form monolayer crystals.

Researchers already suspected salt could facilitate the process, Yakobson said. Liu came to him to request a molecular model analysis to learn why salt made it easier to melt metals with chalcogens and get them...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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