CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS PUBLISH DESIGNS FOR OPEN-SOURCE 3D BIOPRINTER

3dprintingindustry.com | 3/29/2018 | Eric Lai
Click For Photo: https://3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/3D-models-of-all-the-3D-printed-components-required-for-the-LVE.-Image-via.jpg

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source, low-cost 3D bioprinter. They have published a paper in HardwareX with the complete instructions for the installation of a syringe-based large volume extruder (LVE) on a desktop FDM 3D printer.

The LVE allows users to print artificial human tissues at a high resolution and scale. It is designed to print a range of materials, including biopolymers, hydrogels, pastes and epoxies.

Adam - Feinberg - Authors - Paper - Biomedical

Adam Feinberg, one of the authors of the paper and a Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon, said “The LVE 3D bioprinter allows us to print much larger tissue scaffolds, at the scale of an entire human heart, with high quality.”

PrintrBot Simple Metal modified with the LVE. Image via Kira Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton, Adam Feinberg.

Feinberg - LVE - Modifications - PrintrBot - Simple

Feinberg says that the LVE can be installed for less than $500. The modifications were applied to a PrintrBot Simple 3D printer, though the authors say the LVE should be compatible with many desktop FDM 3D printers.

Most commercial 3D bioprinters cost between $10,000-200,000. The cheapest 3D bioprinter on the market is the Allevi 1, at $4,995. Feinberg claims that the LVE is “at least on par with many [3D bioprinters] that cost far more money”, though he did not name any specific 3D bioprinters for comparison.

Kira - Pusch - Graduate - Materials - Science

Kira Pusch, a recent graduate from Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon said that “What we’ve created is a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any open source fused deposition modelling (FDM) printer. This means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation for people who use 3D printers.”

Feinberg’s lab at Carnegie Mellon is aiming to produce more open-source biomedical research,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: 3dprintingindustry.com
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