Artificial "maple seeds" from rockets

phys.org | 3/8/2018 | Staff
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The Space Team at TU Wien is launching an ambitious project together with the University of Würzburg. Measurement devices are going to be ejected from a rocket and will fall to Earth without a parachute.

It's a bold idea, and no one knows for sure if it will work. Tubular measurement devices will be transported to an altitude of 75 kilometres by a rocket and will then return to Earth undamaged and entirely unassisted. If this technology proves successful, it could be a great new tool for meteorological research.

Years - TU - Wien - Space - Team

In recent years, the TU Wien Space team, a group of students at TU Wien (Vienna) has drawn attention to itself with successful rocket launches and satellite projects. Now, the students' association at TU Wien is joining forces with a student team from the University of Würzburg to make the idea of space probes autonomously returning to Earth a reality. The project is called 'Project Daedalus', and is now intended to be implemented in March as part of the international REXUS programme for promoting student space initiatives.

'REXUS/BEXUS' is a collaboration between the German Aerospace Centre, the Swedish National Space Board and the ESA. As part of 'REXUS', two rockets are launched each year in Sweden that carry instruments and experiments developed by students to an altitude of approximately 80 kilometres. The TU Wien Space Team is now also joining the imminent rocket launch in March for the first time.

Aim - Device - Data - Seisl - TU

"The aim was to develop a device with which meteorological data can be collected conveniently and easily," says Sebastian Seisl from the TU Wien Space Team. The altitude of approximately 80 kilometres reached by the REXUS rockets is particularly interesting. For weather balloons, which can climb to a maximum of 30 to 40 kilometres, this is too high, and satellites can only poorly capture data...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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