This is what some of the earliest stars in the universe might have looked like

Popular Science | 3/2/2018 | Staff
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When we look through telescopes, we can see into the past. Light travels fast, but it still takes a lot of time for light from sources spread across the universe to get to our searching eyes. We’ve spotted supermassive black holes from the dawn of the universe, just 800 million years after the big bang. But in a study published this week in Nature, researchers were able to look back even farther than that—180 million years after the big bang—when the very first stars were forming.

“What’s happening in this period,” Alan Rogers, an astronomer at MIT’s Haystack Observatory, said in a press release, “is that some of the radiation from the very first stars is starting to allow hydrogen to be seen. It’s causing hydrogen to start absorbing the background radiation, so you start seeing it...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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