RMIT DEVELOPS 3D PRINTED SMARTPHONE MICROSCOPE FOR REMOTE HEALTHCARE

3dprintingindustry.com | 2/20/2018 | Rushabh Haria
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Looking for a smartphone upgrade? Look no further than your 3D printer.

RMIT University scientists have developed a “clip-on” filter that can turn smartphone cameras into a powerful microscope. Capable of viewing specimens as small as 1/200th of a millimeter, the device will come in handy as a point of care diagnostic tool or research device, for remote healthcare clinics and field research groups.

Light - Source - Device - Phone - Flash

Instead of using an external light source, the handy device is also capable of harnessing the phone’s built-in flash to illuminate discoveries.

“Our mobile microscope can be used as an inexpensive and portable tool for all types of on-site or remote area monitoring,” explains RMIT lead developer Dr. Antony Orth.

WATER - QUALITY - BLOOD - SAMPLES - ENVIRONMENTAL

“WATER QUALITY, BLOOD SAMPLES, ENVIRONMENTAL OBSERVATION, EARLY DISEASE DETECTION AND DIAGNOSIS—THESE ARE ALL AREAS WHERE OUR TECHNOLOGY CAN BE EASILY USED TO GOOD EFFECT.”

Dr. Orth and the team behind the 3D printable microscope attachment work at the RMIT module of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) – a $40 million AUD government initiative, bringing together a number of universities and companies from across Australia to develop new imaging technologies.

Project - Dr - Orth - RMIT - Researchers

Working on the project with Dr. Orth were RMIT researchers E. R. Wilson and B. C. Gibson, and J. G. Thompson from the University of Adelaide.

The concept of Orth, Wilson, Gibson & Thompson’s project was to streamline the bulky equipment associated with conventional microscopes, and make it available to as many people as possible.

Team - Challenges - Microscope - Attachments - Lighting

The team also wanted to overcome the challenges of other 3D printed mobile microscope attachments that typically require external lighting to work.

What the CNBP group have made is a simple, single-piece clip device with channels designed to redirect light from the phone’s flashlight. It can be...
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