Mars Meteorite Will Return to the Red Planet with NASA Rover

Space.com | 2/15/2018 | Staff
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A chunk of rock that was once part of Mars, but landed on Earth as a meteorite, will return to the Red Planet aboard a NASA rover set to launch in 2020.

The meteorite, known as Sayh al Uhaymir 008 (SaU008) was found in Oman in 1999, but geologists determined that it likely originated on Mars, according to a statement from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Scientists think collisions between Mars and other large bodies in the solar system's early days sent chunks of the Red Planet into space, where they might wander for eons before falling onto Earth's surface.

Meteorite - Instrument - SHERLOC - Environments - Raman

The meteorite is being used to calibrate an instrument called the SHERLOC (Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals), which will use techniques often used in forensic science to identify chemicals in the Martian rock samples, in features as thin as a human hair.

A close-up of a meteorite that likely came from Mars.

Researchers - Meteorite - Earth - Instruments - Analysis

The researchers will study the meteorite on Earth, where they are able to make sure their instruments are producing a correct analysis of the rock, and understand what features of the rock are perceptible to their instruments. When the rover settles onto Mars, researchers can once again use the rock to make sure their instruments are working as they should be, before pointing them at features of the Martian surface.

"We're studying things on such a fine scale that slight misalignments, caused by changes in temperature or even the rover settling into sand, can require us to correct our aim," said Luther Beegle, principal investigator for SHERLOC, in the statement. "By studying how the instrument sees a fixed target, we can understand how it will see a piece of the Martian surface."

Meteorites - Earth

There are only about 200 confirmed Martian meteorites that have been found on Earth,...
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