Hidden depths—why groundwater is our most important water source

phys.org | 2/9/2018 | Staff
brunodeuce44 (Posted by) Level 3
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Vivid scenes of worried Cape Town residents clutching empty water vessels in long snaking queues are ricocheting around the globe. Everyone is asking, "How did this happen?" Or, more precisely, "Can it happen in my city?" The importance of effective water management has been shoved, blinking, into the limelight.

In Australia we're watching somewhat nervously, grateful to have been spared the same fate – for now, at least. Experts tell us that the key is "water divestment" – that is, don't put all your eggs in one basket (or, perhaps more appropriately, don't get all your water from the same tap).

Perth - Example - Australia - Success - Water

Perth is held up as a shining example of Australia's success in water divestment. The city now relies partly on desalination and crucially gets almost 70% of its supply from groundwater.

Groundwater, the great salvation of parched cities and agricultural development, is the world's largest freshwater resource. The volume of fresh water in all the world's lakes, rivers and swamps adds up to less than 1% of that of fresh groundwater – like putting a perfume bottle next to a ten-litre bucket.

Climate - Supply - Times - Drought

What's more, because it's underground, it is buffered somewhat from a fickle climate and often used to maintain or supplement supply during times of drought.

Yet caution is required when developing groundwater. Sinking wells everywhere, Beverley Hillbillies style, is unwise. Instead, robust groundwater management is required – defining clearly what we want to achieve and what are we prepared to lose to get it.

Perception - Abundance - Groundwater - Management - Minefields

Despite the common perception of its abundance, groundwater is not inexhaustible. Its management is fraught with minefields greater and more enigmatic than those of surface waters. It is, after all, much easier to spot when a reservoir is about to run dry than a subterranean aquifer.

Only when aquifer depletion is already quite advanced do we begin to see the...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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