MXene material could improve sensors that sniff

phys.org | 2/1/2018 | Staff
leeann77 (Posted by) Level 3
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Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person's breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best "chemical noses" even more sensitive.

In research, recently published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano, the team describes how a two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene can be used as a highly sensitive detector of gaseous chemicals. The paper suggests that MXene can pick up chemicals, such as ammonia and acetone, which are indicators of ulcers and diabetes, in much lower traces than sensors currently being used in medical diagnostics.

MXene - Gas - Sensors - Research - Range

"MXene is one of the most sensitive gas sensors ever reported. This research is significant because it expands the range for detection of common gases allowing us to detect very low concentrations that we were not able to detect before," said Yury Gogotsi, Ph.D., Distinguished University and Bach Professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, who was a lead Drexel author of the study. "The high sensitivity of the device may be used for detecting toxic gases or pollutants found in our environment."

Gogotsi's Nanomaterials Research Group, from Drexel's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, teamed with Hee-Tae Jung, Ph.D., a professor at KAIST in Daejeon, South Korea to explore the gas-sensing properties of titanium carbide MXene. The key to its excellent scent-sleuthing capabilities is that MXene is both highly conductive and undergoes a measurable change of electrical conductivity in the presence of the chemical it's designed to detect—and only when that particular chemical is present.

Discernment - Signal-to-noise - Ratio - World - Chemical

This discernment is called "signal-to-noise" ratio in the world of chemical sensors and it is...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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