Bittersweet honour for mother who won a ban on legal highs after her daughter died from a 'party drug' at 21

Mail Online | 5/18/1991 | Vanessa Allen for the Daily Mail
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A mother who won her campaign to outlaw so-called legal highs after the death of her daughter has been honoured.

Maryon Stewart fought for a change in legislation after her 21-year-old daughter Hester died when she was given the 'party drug' gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in 2009.

Countries - US - Sweden

It had already been banned in countries including the US and Sweden.

Mrs Stewart lobbied successive home secretaries to ban such substances, which were designed to mimic the effects of illegal drugs such as cocaine, ecstasy and cannabis.

Mother - Charity - Angelus - Foundation - Panel

The mother founded a charity, the Angelus Foundation, and assembled an advisory panel of experts.

In 2016 she succeeded in winning a change in the law when the Psychoactive Substances Act came into effect, banning the supply of legal highs in Britain.

Mrs - Stewart - Award - Empire - Medal

Mrs Stewart, 64, said her award of a British Empire Medal was bittersweet because she could not share it with her daughter, who had been studying molecular medicine at Sussex University when she died.

She said: 'This is a very special, yet sad, day for me, as I'd love to share it with my daughter Hester.

Efforts - Campaign - Highs - Government - Change

'I am so proud that my efforts to campaign against legal highs not only prompted government change but, through increased awareness, also prevented harm and saved many young lives, leaving other families whole.'

Mrs Stewart met with home secretaries and gave evidence about the dangers of legal highs to the Home Affairs Committee in Parliament.

Party - Drugs - Drugs - Availability - Online

She warned that the so-called party drugs were often just as dangerous and addictive as illegal drugs, but that their widespread availability online and in shops misled users into believing...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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