New drone-based approach to detecting structural damage during extreme events such as earthquakes

phys.org | 8/28/2017 | Staff
jster97 (Posted by) Level 3
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A team of researchers from across UC San Diego is developing a new approach for detecting damage to buildings during earthquakes and other extreme events.

The information is intended to provide both researchers and emergency responders with more detailed information on how structures respond during the earthquakes—beyond the simple visual inspection of buildings currently in use—prior to allowing them to reopen.

Researchers - Scripps - Institution - Oceanography - Jacobs

According to researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego who are spearheading the project, the iconic library is the perfect location to begin what they hope will become an effort to digitize the entire campus.

"We are using this culturally significant building on campus as a reference model to help detect structural changes over time," said Falko Kuester, a professor of structural engineering who serves as director of the Jacob's School Cultural Heritage Engineering Initiative (CHEI) and DroneLab.

Yehuda - Bock - Researcher - Director - Orbit

For Yehuda Bock, a distinguished researcher and director of the Orbit and Permanent Array Center at Scripps Oceanography, the primary motivation for the recent survey of Geisel Library was to integrate structural monitoring into his early-warning prototype system for earthquakes and tsunamis.

"Our system tracks ground motions at a millimeter level of accuracy," said Bock. "This allows us to detect large earthquakes within the critical first minute before the shaking begins."

Months - Bock - Geisel - Library - Sensors

Six months ago, Bock equipped the Geisel Library with sensors that continuously measure ground motion from the many faults that crisscross Southern California. The technique he helped pioneer, called seismogeodesy, relies on a combination of GPS receivers and accelerators to very rapidly pinpoint the location and magnitude of strong earthquakes—6.0 magnitude or greater—before the hazardous trembling begins.

The late-July project involved nearly two hours of drone flights led by CHEI researcher Eric Lo, capturing more than 1,000 high-resolution images of the Geisel Library that will be turned into...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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