Connect dots: After Charlottesville, journalists should cover anti-Semitism as distinct from 'racism'

GetReligion | 8/14/2017 | Ira Rifkin
jesse456 (Posted by) Level 3
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North Korea surely has potential consequences that are far greater for more people in Asia and elsewhere than do Venezuela (a non-story born out of another thoughtless remark by our commander in chief) and Charlottesville.

But I'm going with Charlottesville here, because, as I was told in Journalism 101, all news is local and personal. And I happen to be an American and a Jew and what I learned a half-century ago in journalism school remains true.

President - Anti-Semitism - Casting - Jews - Role

I’m disappointed that the president did not also directly address the anti-Semitism, the historical casting of Jews in the archetypal role of the villainous “other” out to undermine, in its American iteration, traditional white Christian (culturally if not religiously so) society. Not after how openly anti-Semitism was displayed in Charlottesville.

This Washington Post analysis piece does a good job of explaining why that happened in the context of what ostensibly was a dispute over the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

President - Anti-Semitism - Rubric - Racism - Society

It’s not enough for the president to lump anti-Semitism under the rubric of racism, as he did, because in American society today “racism” generally refers to the white-black divide, and to a lesser degree, the debate over immigration.

Ironically, prior to Charlottesville I was going to post this week about another ominous story published just days earlier in the Washington Post and datelined Oranienburg, Germany, the former site of the infamous Sachsenhausen Nazi concentration camp.

Chunk - Story - Opening

Here’s a hefty chunk of the story’s opening:

ORANIENBURG, Germany – He walked across the bleak expanse of what was once the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, toward the gas chamber that had been stocked with liquid Zyklon B, and posed the question that still strains the conscience of modern German society.

Osman - Jamo

“How was it possible?” Osman Jamo asked.

Yet he also wondered why the site, where barbed wire and guard towers stood dark...
(Excerpt) Read more at: GetReligion
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