How brain circuits govern hunger and cravings

ScienceDaily | 6/14/2017 | Staff
finter (Posted by) Level 4
By developing a new approach to imaging and manipulating particular groups of neurons in the mouse brain, scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have identified a pathway by which neurons that drive hunger influence distant neurons involved in the decision of whether or not to react to food-related cues. Their findings could open the door to targeted therapies that dampen food cue-evoked cravings in people with obesity. The research was published online today in the journal Nature.

"The main question we were asking is: how do evolutionarily ancient hunger-promoting neurons at the base of the brain, in the hypothalamus, influence 'cognitive' brain areas to help us find and eat calorie-rich foods in a complex and changing world?" said co-corresponding author Mark Andermann, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at BIDMC and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School (HMS).

Picture - Cheeseburger - Behavior - Author - Yoav

"To put it simply, when you're hungry, the picture of a cheeseburger may be extremely appealing and effective in influencing your behavior," explained lead author Yoav Livneh, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at BIDMC. "But if your belly is full after eating a big meal, the same cheeseburger picture will be unappealing. We think that the pathway we discovered from hunger-promoting neurons to a region of the brain called the insular cortex plays an important role here."

Brain imaging data in humans support the notion that the insular cortex is involved in deciding if a source of food is worth pursuing. In healthy humans, the insular cortex increases its activity in response to food cues during hunger but not following a meal. Studies suggest that this process often goes awry in patients with obesity or other eating disorders that exhibit excessive cravings. Those findings indicate that specific changes in brain activity, including increased sensitivity to food cues,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
Wake Up To Breaking News!
I find it extremely funny when people keep voting and expecting the government to change!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!