Mechanisms behind sensory deficits in Parkinson's disease

ScienceDaily | 5/18/2017 | Staff
doona07 (Posted by) Level 3
There are some 18,000 people with Parkinson's disease in Sweden, and around 2,000 new diagnoses every year. The disease, which is one of our most common neurological conditions, is currently incurable, although its symptoms can be alleviated.

When we think of Parkinson's disease, we often focus on its motor symptoms, such as stiffness and trembling, which are caused by a gradual decrease in the dopamine supply to a brain area called the striatum, the primary input nucleus of the basal ganglia.

Research - Parkinson - Disease - Motor - Impairments

Research on Parkinson's disease has mainly focused on these motor impairments. However, patients are also affected by severe sensory problems, including an impaired sense of smell, touch and vision, and this area of research has remained relatively neglected.

"Our study highlights the sensory aspects of basal ganglia function and presents a new approach to the mechanisms behind the sensory impairments seen in Parkinson's disease," says Gilad Silberberg, associate professor at Karolinska...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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