Adults with autism overcome childhood language challenges

ScienceDaily | 3/1/2017 | Staff
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Studies analyzing electrical activity in the brains of children with autism have shown that they have difficulty sorting out pairs of words that are unrelated -- like "clock" and "frog" -- from those that are related -- like "baby" and "bottle" -- making it hard for them to process written or spoken language. Moreover, investigators believed that for most children with autism, this struggle with language persisted throughout their lives.

Results of the new research from specialists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, published in the March issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, suggests that at least some adults with autism process unrelated words as well as adults without the disorder and their brains use distinct learning strategies to do so.

Assumption - People - Autism - Problems - Meaning

"There is often an assumption that people with autism will always have problems understanding the meaning of language," says Emily Coderre, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "But our results suggest that adults with autism seem to use an alternative mechanism to process language that results in a different pattern in the brain."

For the study, the researchers recruited 20 adults with autism spectrum disorder, considered mild to moderate. All participants had "normal" verbal abilities, according to standardized tests. Those with autism spectrum disorder were diagnosed by a specialist on the team based on their score on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Some participants were diagnosed early in life, and others not until adulthood. Many participants went to regular schools with special education tracks. Some participants had graduated high school, and some went through college. The research team also recruited a matching group of 20 participants without autism to serve as a comparative control group. Participants overall ranged in age from 18 to 69. Six were female, 35 were white, one was Asian,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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