Physicists trap light in nanoresonators for record time

phys.org | 7/24/2018 | Staff
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An international team of researchers from ITMO University, the Australian National University, and Korea University have experimentally trapped an electromagnetic wave in a gallium arsenide nanoresonator a few hundred nanometers in size for a record-breaking time. Earlier attempts to trap light for such a long time have only been successful with much larger resonators. In addition, the researchers have provided experimental proof that this resonator may be used as a basis for an efficient light frequency nanoconverter. The results of this research have raised great interest among the scientific community and were published in Science, one of the world's leading academic journals. Scientists have made suggestions about drastically new opportunities for subwavelength optics and nanophotonics—including the development of compact sensors, night vision devices, and optical data transmission technologies.

The problem of manipulating the properties of electromagnetic waves at the nanoscale is of paramount importance in modern physics. Using light, we can transfer data over long distances, record and read-out data, and perform other operations critical to data processing. To do this, light needs to be trapped in a small space and held there for a long period of time, which is something that physicists have only succeeded in doing with objects of a significant size, larger than the wavelength of light. This limits the use of optical signals in optoelectronics.

Years - Research - Team - ITMO - University

Two years ago, an international research team from ITMO University, the Australian National University, and the Ioffe Institute had theoretically predicted a new mechanism that allows scientists to trap light in miniature resonators much smaller than the wavelength of light and measured in hundreds of nanometers. However, until recently, no one had implemented the mechanism in practice.

An international team of researchers from ITMO University, the Australian National University, and Korea University was assembled to prove this hypothesis. First, they developed the concept:...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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