Forget Dry January — drinking alcohol in moderation may be linked to a longer lifespan

Business Insider | 1/15/2020 | Mia de Graaf
itsdonaldkitsdonaldk (Posted by) Level 3
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Harvard researchers studied 30 years of data on 120,000 men and women aged 30-55 to assess how lifestyle factors affect life expectancy.

They found people who have a few alcoholic drinks a week live more years free of diabetes and heart disease than those who don't drink or drink too much.

Studies - Month - Sobriety - Anxiety - Health

Previous studies have found that a month of sobriety may cause more short-term anxiety than long-term health benefits.

Experts warn restrictive diets, including Dry January, can also leave people with unhealthy and anxious attitudes towards food and drink.

Excesses - Holiday - Period - Dry - January

After the excesses of the holiday period, Dry January seems like a wise idea, giving our livers, skin, and bank accounts a rest by avoiding alcohol for the first month of the year.

The trend, which started as a one-off marketing stunt in the UK a decade ago, is now an annual global phenomenon. One in 5 Americans try to commit to sobriety in January, according to a recent YouGov poll.

New - Research - Benefits - Alcohol - Diet

New research, however, suggests the benefits of cutting out alcohol may be exaggerated, and, as long as you maintain a healthy diet, the occasional drink may actually be good for you.

Researchers at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health studied 30 years of data on nearly 80,000 women and 40,000 men to understand how their lifestyle habits affected their lifespan. Aside from eating a balanced diet and avoiding cigarettes, they found that the healthiest people with the longest life expectancies also drank a few units of alcohol a week.

Women - Alcohol - Day - Drink - Men

Women who reported drinking up to 15g of alcohol a day (roughly one drink), and men who had up to 30g a day were less likely to prematurely develop diabetes and heart disease than those who had avoided alcohol altogether or drank in excess, the study found. This was the case particularly if they...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Business Insider
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