Identity of Fourth Soviet Spy Who Stole US Atomic Bomb Secrets Finally Revealed

livescience.com | 11/26/2019 | Mindy Weisberger
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Three American spies were long known for having stolen U.S. atomic secrets between 1940 and 1948, sharing that information with the Soviets. Their actions fast-tracked the U.S.S.R's development of nuclear weapons and set the stage for the Cold War.

But in fact, there was a fourth spy — code-name "Godsend" — who handed over atomic secrets to Soviet intelligence. This person's identity was concealed from public view until now.

Name - Oscar - Seborer - Los - Alamos

His real name was Oscar Seborer, and he worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, home of the Manhattan Project where the first nuclear weapons were designed. For decades, Seborer's name languished in relative obscurity, mentioned in a few dozen pages amid tens of thousands of secret documents compiled by the FBI.

But once these files were declassified in 2011, they came to the attention of two historians, John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr; 70 years after Seborer betrayed his country, his story is finally being told, The New York Times recently reported.

Klehr - Library - Congress - Haynes - Emeritus

Klehr, formerly at the Library of Congress, and Haynes, an emeritus professor at Emory University in Georgia, previously collaborated on books about communism and Soviet-era spying, such as "Venona: Decoding Soviet Espionage in America" (1999) and "Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America" (2010), both released by Yale University Press.

Before this discovery, the three spies known for bringing atomic secrets to the Soviets from Los Alamos were David Greenglass, Klaus Fuchs and Theodore Hall. A fourth spy was proposed in the early 1990s based on clues in KGB officers' memoirs, but those clues were found in 1995 to be part of a Russian misinformation campaign to protect another active agent, Klehr and Haynes wrote in a new study. They published their findings online in the latest issue of the CIA journal Studies in Intelligence....
(Excerpt) Read more at: livescience.com
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