Scientists looked at sea levels 125,000 years in the past. The results are terrifying

phys.org | 11/6/2019 | Staff
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Sea levels rose 10 metres above present levels during Earth's last warm period 125,000 years ago, according to new research that offers a glimpse of what may happen under our current climate change trajectory.

Our paper, published today in Nature Communications, shows that melting ice from Antarctica was the main driver of sea level rise in the last interglacial period, which lasted about 10,000 years.

Sea - Levels - Challenges - Humanity - Climate

Rising sea levels are one of the biggest challenges to humanity posed by climate change, and sound predictions are crucial if we are to adapt.

This research shows that Antarctica, long thought to be the "sleeping giant" of sea level rise, is actually a key player. Its ice sheets can change quickly, and in ways that could have huge implications for coastal communities and infrastructure in future.

Earth - Cycles - Consist - Glacial - Periods—or

Earth's cycles consist of both cold glacial periods—or ice ages—when large parts of the world are covered in large ice sheets, and warmer interglacial periods when the ice thaws and sea levels rise.

The Earth is presently in an interglacial period which began about 10,000 years ago. But greenhouse gas emissions over the past 200 years have caused climate changes that are faster and more extreme than experienced during the last interglacial. This means past rates of sea level rise provide only low-end predictions of what might happen in future.

Data - Interglacial - Years - Temperatures - Future

We examined data from the last interglacial, which occurred 125,000 to 118,000 years ago. Temperatures were up to 1℃ higher than today—similar to those projected for the near future.

Our research reveals that ice melt in the last interglacial period caused global seas to rise about 10 metres above the present level. The ice melted first in Antarctica, then a few thousand years later in Greenland.

Sea - Levels - Metres - Century - Rise

Sea levels rose at up to 3 metres per century, far exceeding the roughly 0.3-metre rise observed over the past...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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