Physicists May Have Finally Found a Way to Peek at Schrödinger's Cat Inside the Box

livescience.com | 11/7/2019 | Dana Najjar - Live Science Contributor
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There may be a way of sneaking a peak at Schrödinger's cat — the famous feline-based thought experiment that describes the mysterious behavior of subatomic particles — without permanently killing the (hypothetical) animal.

The unlucky, imaginary cat is simultaneously alive and dead inside a box, or exists in a superposition of "dead" and "alive" states, just as subatomic particles exist in a superposition of many states at once. But looking inside the box changes the state of the cat, which then becomes either alive or dead.

Study - Oct - New - Journal - Physics

Now, however, a study published Oct. 1 in the New Journal of Physics describes a way to potentially peek at the cat without forcing it to live or die. In doing so, it advances scientists' understanding of one of the most fundamental paradoxes in physics.

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In our ordinary, large-scale world, looking at an object doesn't seem to change it. But zoom in enough, and that's not the case.

Price - Nothing - Author - Holger - F

"We normally think the price we pay for looking is nothing," said study lead author Holger F. Hofmann, associate professor of physics at Hiroshima University in Japan. "That's not correct. In order to look, you have to have light, and light changes the object." That's because even a single photon of light transfers energy away from or to the object you're viewing.

Hofmann and Kartik Patekar, who was a visiting undergraduate student at Hiroshima University at the time and is now at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, wondered if there was a way to look without "paying the price." They landed on a mathematical framework that separates the initial interaction (looking at the cat) from the readout (knowing whether it's...
(Excerpt) Read more at: livescience.com
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