Scientists discover method to create and trap trions at room temperature

phys.org | 10/16/2019 | Staff
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Trions consist of three charged particles bound together by very weak bonding energy. Although trions can potentially carry more information than electrons in applications such as electronics and quantum computing, trions are typically unstable at room temperature, and the bonds between trion particles are so weak that they quickly fall apart. Most research on trions requires supercooled temperatures, and even then, their fleeting nature has made trions difficult to control and hard to study.

A University of Maryland-led team of researchers has discovered a method to reliably synthesize and trap trions that remain stable at room temperature. The research makes it possible to manipulate trions and study their fundamental properties. The work is described in a research paper published on October 16, 2019, in the journal ACS Central Science.

Work - Trions - Method - Ways - YuHuang

"This work makes synthesizing trions very efficient and provides a method for manipulating them in ways we haven't been able to before," said YuHuang Wang, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UMD and a senior author of the paper. "With the ability to stabilize and trap trions, we have the potential to build a very clean system for studying the processes governing light-emitting diodes and photovoltaics and for developing quantum information technologies."

In the new study, Wang and his colleagues used a chemical reaction to create defects on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The defects cause depressions in the energy landscape of the conductive surface of the nanotube. These depressions can be thought of as wells that charged particles flowing by could fall into and become trapped inside.

Defects - Researchers - Photons - Nanotubes - Luminescence

After creating the defects, the researchers directed photons at the nanotubes and observed bright luminescence at defect sites. Each flash of luminescence at a characteristic wavelength indicated that an electron and a particle called an exciton had become trapped at a defect site and bound...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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