Religious Freedom Under Threat for Christians and Muslims

Juicy Ecumenism | 9/11/2019 | Josiah Aden
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Religious freedom discrimination is an increasingly common threat against both Christians and Muslims, according to a panel of journalists, lawyers, and authors hosted by the National Religious Broadcasters (NRB).

The solution agreed upon was an increase in acceptance for Muslims, and a “level playing field” for all religions in America.

NRB - September - Event - Freedom - Religion

NRB hosted the September 11, 2019 event to discuss freedom of religion. NRB General Counsel Craig Parshall moderated the discussion, which featured Muslim author and lawyer Asma Uddin and Christian journalist Steven Waldman.

Although Parshall was candidly in support of Waldman, Uddin and Waldman had a lively discussion splitting hairs about the nature of religious discrimination in the United States, and what should be done about it. Parshall asked Uddin about her response to a hypothetical situation about Islamic religious freedom, from a legal perspective. Waldman was asked more intellectual and philosophical questions.

Parshall - Panelist - Platform - Debate - Uddin

Parshall opened by asking each panelist about their platform for the debate: Uddin pointed out that religion is deeply politicized, and it must be less politicized to move religious freedom forward. She mentioned two kinds of religious conflict, major and minor: i.e., “Christians vs. Muslims,” and accommodations battles. Waldman focused on national media portrayal of religion, alleging a lack of objectivity by media outlets, mentioning the conservatism of Fox and the liberalism of CNN. The journalist started a website built around the idea of “multi-faith” conversation, rather than “inter-faith:” the idea that religious groups should work together for more objective media portrayal and religious freedom, rather than focusing on the commonalities among particular groups.

Both Uddin and Waldman agreed that hate speech codes, which “restrict free speech in public venues, like the kinds used by some public universities, are a bad idea.” All three agreed that Muslims face discrimination; Parshall agreed that Muslims are seen as “sympathetic victims.” Parshall argued that Christians...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Juicy Ecumenism
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