Contraceptive pills may raise the risk of type 2 diabetes

Mail Online | 9/16/2019 | Vanessa Chalmers Health Reporter For Mailonline
Mireille (Posted by) Level 3
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The Pill raises the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 22-year long study of 80,000 women.

Women who take the oral contraceptive are a third more likely to get the disease than those who have never used it, the research found.

Scientists - Surge - Hormones - Link - Body

Scientists blame a surge of hormones for the link, which may affect how the body metabolises sugar down.

But critics rejected the idea the Pill is unsafe and said efforts to slash diabetes should be focused on helping people lose weight.

Dr - Sopio - Tatulashvili - Avicenne - Hospital

Dr Sopio Tatulashvili, from Avicenne Hospital, France, and her colleagues studied 83,799 French women between 1992 and 2014.

They said: 'Risk induced by oral contraceptives could lead to personalised advice for young women at risk of developing T2D, such as those with a family history of diabetes, those who are overweight or obese, or those with polycystic ovary syndrome.'

Scientists - Women - Body - Weight - Status

The scientists looked at the women's body weight, smoking status, age, physical activity, wealth, education level, family history and blood pressure.

They found the use of contraceptive pills at least once over a lifetime compared with no use led to a 33 per cent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Experts - Findings - Evidence - Pills - Diabetes

Independent experts said the findings add to previous evidence linking contraceptive pills and type 2 diabetes.

However, they it is not proven the Pill directly causes type 2 diabetes and therefore should not cause fear among women.

Professor - Medicine - Naveed - Sattar - University

Professor of metabolic medicine Naveed Sattar, University of Glasgow, said the findings 'did not surprise' him.

He said: 'The researchers are very modest about the significance of the findings. It hasn't shown to be a direct cause, but is in keeping with what we know.

'It - Pill - Metabolism - Insulin - Resistance

'It's biologically plausible. The pill can stress your metabolism and can worsen insulin resistance - when insulin doesn't work as well as it should.

'But in the grand scheme of things, women don't need...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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