Historically black colleges give graduates a wage boost

phys.org | 8/17/2018 | Staff
Mijac (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/2019/1-historically.jpg

In 2010, two economists claimed that graduates of historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, suffer a "wage penalty"—that is, they earn relatively less than they would had they gone to a non-HBCU.

In an early draft of the paper, the economists—one from Harvard and the other from MIT—argued that while HBCUs may have served a useful purpose back in the 1970s, they were now, by some measures, serving to "retard black progress." The reason why, they suggested, is that traditionally white institutions may have gotten better at educating black students and that there might be value in "cross-racial connections" when it came time to get a job.

Paper - Data - Headlines - HBCUs - Instance

The paper, which relied on data from the 1950s through the early 2000s, generated negative headlines for HBCUs. For instance, The Wall Street Journal called HBCUs "academically inferior." The New York Times warned readers about the "declining payoff from black colleges."

As a scholar who has researched HBCUs, my colleagues and I have found contrary evidence: Students who went to HBCUs do not suffer a relative wage penalty. In fact, we found that they typically and on average earn more than similar students who went to non-HBCUs. Our findings are based on comparing HBCUs to other schools with a sizable black student population.

People - Civil - War - Jim - Crow

Largely established to serve black people after the Civil War and in the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, HBCUs were the only higher education option for many black Americans up through the mid-1960s during the push for integration. Since then, HBCUs have served a declining share of black students. For instance, HBCUs served 17.3% of black college students in 1980, but by 2015 the figure had fallen to 8.5%.

HBCUs have been in a constant struggle for their financial survival because of declining enrollment, among other things. In fact, some college finance experts...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Tagged:
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!