U.S. Charges Chinese Professor In Latest Shot At Huawei

www.oann.com | 9/6/2019 | Staff
sheenabeanna (Posted by) Level 3
(Reuters) – U.S. prosecutors have charged a Chinese professor with fraud for allegedly taking technology from a California company to benefit Huawei, in another shot at the embattled Chinese telecommunications equipment maker.

Bo Mao was arrested in Texas Aug. 14 and released six days later on $100,000 bond after he consented to proceed with the case in New York, according to court documents.

US - District - Court - Brooklyn - Aug

He pleaded not guilty in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn on Aug. 28 to a charge of conspiring to commit wire fraud.

According to the criminal complaint, Mao entered into an agreement with the unnamed California tech company to obtain its circuit board, claiming it was for academic research.

Complaint - Telecommunications - Conglomerate - Sources - Huawei

But the complaint accuses an unidentified Chinese telecommunications conglomerate, which sources say is Huawei, of trying to steal the technology, and alleges Mao played a role in its alleged scheme. A court document also indicates the case is related to Huawei.

Mao, an associate professor at Xiamen University in China who also became a visiting professor at a Texas university last fall, first gained attention as part of a Texas civil case between Huawei and Silicon Valley startup CNEX Labs Inc.

December - Huawei - CNEX - Employee - Yiren

In December 2017, Huawei sued CNEX and a former employee, Yiren Huang, for stealing trade secrets. Huang, a former engineering manager at a U.S. Huawei subsidiary, helped start CNEX in 2013 three days after leaving the company.

As part of its counterclaims, CNEX said Mao had asked for one of its circuit boards for a research project and that, after it sent the board to the professor, he used it for a study tied to Huawei.

Case - June - Nothing - Verdict

That case ended in June with a “take nothing” verdict.

A jury did not find CNEX stole trade secrets, but decided Huang violated his employment contract by not notifying the company of patents he obtained within a year of leaving.

However,...
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