Off the hook: California king salmon rebounds after drought

phys.org | 7/22/2019 | Staff
eymira (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/hires/2019/offthehookca.jpg

Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon.

Reeling in a fish "feels good every time," but this year has been surprisingly good, said Bates, a commercial troller based in San Francisco.

Bates - California - Fishermen - Salmon - Fishing

Bates and other California fishermen are reporting one of the best salmon fishing seasons in years, thanks to heavy rain and snow that ended the state's historic drought.

It's a sharp reversal for chinook salmon, also known as king salmon, an iconic species that helps sustain many Pacific Coast fishing communities.

Salmon - Catches - Preseason - Forecasts - %

Commercial salmon catches have surpassed official preseason forecasts by about 50%, said Kandice Morgenstern, a marine scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Harvests have been particularly strong in Morro Bay, Monterey and San Francisco, but weaker along California's northern coast.

"We're really surprised to be seeing this many fish being landed so far this season," Morgenstern said.

Salmon - Rebound - Years - Catches - Conditions

The salmon rebound comes after three years of extremely low catches that resulted from poor ocean conditions and California's five-year drought, which drained the state's rivers and reservoirs.

Over the past several years, regulators imposed severe fishing restrictions to protect chinook salmon, and officials declared federal fishery disasters in 2018 to assist fishing communities in California, Oregon and Washington.

Year - Adult - Salmon - Class - Record

This year's adult salmon are the first class to benefit from record rainfall that filled California rivers and streams in early 2017, making it easier for juvenile chinook to migrate to the Pacific Ocean, where they grow into full-size fish.

Chinook salmon are also being helped by improved ocean conditions that have produced an abundance of anchovies, krill and other feed. Several years ago, an El Nino event brought unusually warm water to the Pacific Coast and disrupted the marine ecosystem.

Fishermen

"For the salmon fishermen who've...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
A slice out of infinity
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!