Practical anonymous communication protocol developed for quantum networks

phys.org | 2/26/2018 | Staff
malik778 (Posted by) Level 3
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The ability to securely transmit information over the internet is extremely important, but most of the time, eavesdroppers can still generally determine who the sender and receiver are. In some highly confidential situations, it is important that the sender's and receiver's identities remain anonymous.

Over the past couple of decades, researchers have been developing protocols for anonymously transmitting messages over classical networks, but similar protocols for quantum networks are still in much earlier stages of development. The anonymity methods that have been proposed for quantum networks so far face challenges such as implementation difficulties or require that strong assumptions be made about the resources, making them impractical for use in the real world.

Paper - Anupama - Unnikrishnan - Ian - MacFarlane

In a new paper, Anupama Unnikrishnan, Ian MacFarlane, Richard Yi, Eleni Diamanti, Damian Markham, and Iordanis Kerenidis, from the University of Oxford, MIT, Sorbonne University, the University of Paris and CNRS, have proposed the first practical protocol for anonymous communication in quantum networks.

"Our protocol brings anonymous quantum communication closer to being actually demonstrated in the lab," Unnikrishnan told Phys.org. "We can guarantee anonymity in the most paranoid scenario: without needing to trust the honesty or computational power of players in the network, or even the entanglement they share."

Protocol - Way - Player - Message - Receiver

The new protocol works in the following way. To start, the player who wants to send a message anonymously notifies the receiver. Then, in each round of the protocol, an untrusted source creates an entangled quantum state called the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, and distributes it between the players.

The players then have two...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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