People who post lots of selfies are viewed by others as 'self-absorbed and less successful'

Mail Online | 8/21/2019 | Peter Lloyd for MailOnline
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People who take post of selfies on social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are viewed as 'self-absorbed and less successful' by their peers.

Researchers from Washington State University analysed hundreds of Instagram accounts to find out the first impressions people had of someone's personality.

Correlation - Volume - Person - Self-portraits - Like-ability

They found an inverse correlation between the volume of a person's self-portraits and their like-ability - the less selfies they posted, the better they were rated.

Selfie-takers were also deemed more insecure and less open to new experiences than people who share photographs taken by other people.

Feeds - Content - Depictions - Achievement - Travel

'Even when two feeds had similar content, such as depictions of achievement or travel, feelings about the person who posted selfies were negative and feelings about the person who posted posies were positive,' said Chris Barry, WSU professor of psychology and lead author of the study.

'It shows there are certain visual cues, independent of context, that elicit either a positive or negative response on social media.'

Professor - Barry - WSU - Psychology - Students

Professor Barry, along with WSU psychology students and collaborators from the University of Southern Mississippi, analysed data from two different control groups of students for the study.

The first consisted of 30 undergraduates who were asked to complete a personality questionnaire and agreed to let the researchers use their 30 most recent Instagram posts for the experiment.

Posts - Selfies - Posies - Image - Appearance

The posts were coded based on whether they were selfies or posies as well as what was depicted in each image, such as physical appearance, affiliation with others, events, activities or accomplishments.

The second group consisted of 119 undergraduates. This group was asked to rate...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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