Biochemists discover new insights into what may go awry in brains of Alzheimer's patients

ScienceDaily | 8/19/2019 | Staff
DanRules394 (Posted by) Level 3
Scientists have known for years that amyloid fibrils -- harmful, elongated, water-tight rope-like structures -- form in the brains of people with Alzheimer's, and likely hold important clues to the disease. UCLA Professor David Eisenberg and an international team of chemists and molecular biologists reported in the journal Nature in 2005 that amyloid fibrils contain proteins that interlock like the teeth of a zipper. The researchers also reported their hypothesis that this dry molecular zipper is in the fibrils that form in Alzheimer's disease, as well as in Parkinson's disease and two dozen other degenerative diseases. Their hypothesis has been supported by recent studies.

Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia among older adults, is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that kills brain cells, gradually destroys memory and eventually affects thinking, behavior and the ability to carry out the daily tasks of life. More than 5.5 million Americans, most of whom are over 65, are thought to have dementia caused by Alzheimer's.

UCLA - Team - Reports - Nature - Communications

The UCLA team reports in the journal Nature Communications that the small protein beta amyloid, also known as a peptide, that plays an important role in Alzheimer's has a normal version that may be less harmful than previously thought and an age-damaged version that is more harmful.

Rebeccah Warmack, who was a UCLA graduate student at the time of the study and is its lead author, discovered that a specific version of age-modified beta amyloid contains a second molecular zipper not previously known to exist. Proteins live in water, but all the water gets pushed out as the fibril is sealed and zipped up. Warmack worked closely with UCLA graduate students David Boyer, Chih-Te Zee and Logan Richards; as well as senior research scientists Michael Sawaya and Duilio Cascio.

Beta - Amyloid - Forms

What goes wrong with beta amyloid, whose most common forms have 40...
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