Joint lubricating fluid plays key role in osteoarthritic pain, study finds

ScienceDaily | 8/14/2019 | Staff
maye (Posted by) Level 3
Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes joint pain and stiffness, and in some people swelling and tenderness of the joints. The condition affects an individual's quality of life and costs millions to the global economy, both directly in terms of healthcare costs and indirectly due to impact on the individual's working life.

Osteoarthritis tends to occur later in life and has been largely considered as a degenerative disorder in which pain is produced by damage and wear and tear to bone and cartilage. However, in recent years it has become clear that osteoarthritis is not restricted to cartilage damage, but is a failure of the entire joint, with inflammation -- the body's response to stress and injury -- being a major contributor to the pain experienced by patients. A recent collaboration between the two pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and Eli Lilly has found that their anti-inflammatory drug, tanezumab, produced pain relief for osteoarthritic patients in a phase 3 clinical trial.

Inflammation - Osteoarthritis - Body - Number - Cells

When inflammation occurs during osteoarthritis, the body produces an increased number of cells within and around the joint. These cells release inflammatory substances into the synovial fluid, the lubricant that allows joints to move smoothly. During osteoarthritis, synovial fluid becomes less viscous and these inflammatory substances come into direct contact with sensory nerve cells in the joint, producing the sensation of pain.

In a study published in the journal Rheumatology on 13 August 2019, researchers at the University of Cambridge and Addenbrooke's Hospital, part of Cambridge University Hospitals, examined whether synovial fluid produced during osteoarthritis is capable of directly exciting sensory nerves supplying knee joints -- those nerves responsible for transmitting pain signals.

Osteoarthritis - Condition - Pain - Sam - Chakrabarti

"Osteoarthritis can be a very painful condition, but we only know a little about what causes this pain," says Sam Chakrabarti, a Gates Cambridge Scholar. "We wanted to...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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