Brains work in sync during music therapy

ScienceDaily | 7/25/2019 | Staff
aka1aka1 (Posted by) Level 4
The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, was carried out by Professor Jorg Fachner and Dr Clemens Maidhof of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

This is the first music therapy study to use a procedure called hyperscanning, which records activity in two brains at the same time, allowing researchers to better understand how people interact.

Session - Study - Music - Patient - Illness

During the session documented in the study, classical music was played as the patient discussed a serious illness in her family. Both patient and therapist wore EEG (electroencephalogram) caps containing sensors, which capture electrical signals in the brain, and the session was recorded in sync with the EEG using video cameras.

Music therapists work towards "moments of change," where they make a meaningful connection with their patient. At one point during this study, the patient's brain activity shifted suddenly from displaying deep negative feelings to a positive peak. Moments later, as the therapist realised the session was working, her scan displayed similar results. In subsequent interviews, both identified that as a moment when they felt the therapy was really working.

Researchers - Activity - Brain - Right - Lobes

The researchers examined activity in the brain's right and left frontal lobes where...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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