Researchers develop new chip for superior forensic blood residue detection

phys.org | 11/13/2017 | Staff
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The BGU microfluidic chip not only increases the chemiluminescent intensity severalfold, but also prolongs the glow time of luminol, enabling the detection of much smaller blood samples in a forensic scene. The chip device was developed by BGU Prof. Alina Karabchevsky, (pictured here)head of BGU's Light-on-a-Chip Group, a member of the BGU Unit of Electro-Optical Engineering and the Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. Credit: Dani Machlis, Ben-Gurion U.

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have developed a new chip device that offers superior identification of miniscule blood residues for forensic applications.

Criminologists - Microscopic - Blood - Drops - Hydrogen

Criminologists use luminol to identify microscopic blood drops, as well as low hydrogen peroxide concentrations, proteins and DNA. These are all invisible to the naked eye but become visible through a chemical reaction known as "chemiluminescence." Detecting biological residues using this method is cost effective and advantageous since the detected signal does not depend on an external light source.

The BGU microfluidic chip not only increases the chemiluminescent intensity severalfold, but also prolongs the glow...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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