The Terror: Infamy Boss on Tackling the Untold Horror of Japanese American Internment Camps

TVGuide.com | 7/18/2019 | Liam Mathews
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Season 1 of AMC's horror anthology The Terror was one of the most impressive TV undertakings of 2018. Executive producers David Kajganich and Soo Hugh adapted Dan Simmons' speculative history novel about an Arctic expedition gone terribly wrong: Two British naval ships get stuck in the ice as they try to find the elusive Northwest Passage across Canada in the 1840s and are bedeviled by threats from outside — a murderous polar bear-like monster called the Tuunbaq, who protects the local Inuit community — and in, as the men go insane from lead poisoning and isolation. Season 1 had a remarkable blend of meticulous maritime historical detail, Emmy-worthy performances from serious actors like Jared Harris, Tobias Menzies, and Ciaran Hinds, a relentless sense of dread, and a vividly physical depiction of bone-deep Arctic cold. And it was all in service of a story that explored themes of white men's catastrophic attempts to control nature and other people.

Season 2 is perhaps even more ambitious. Subtitled Infamy, it's a ghost story set against the backdrop of Japanese American internment during World War II. It follows the members of a Japanese American community from California to a fictional internment camp, and the angry ghost that followed them across the Pacific to remind them of what they left behind.

Cast - George - Takei - Boy - Internment

The cast includes George Takei, who as a boy actually was held in an internment camp and who also serves as an advisor on historical accuracy. It resurfaces a shameful and under-dramatized chapter of American history that has obvious parallels to what's happening in America right now, as the government is holding migrants in camps at the border with Mexico. "We're aiming very high," said executive producer and showrunner Alexander Woo. "It's such an important story to tell. That's why we stay up late and why...
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