Scientists discover how mosquito brains integrate diverse sensory cues to find a host

ScienceDaily | 7/18/2019 | Staff
amyc9948 (Posted by) Level 3
Through behavioral experiments and real-time recording of the female mosquito brain, a team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of Washington, has discovered how the mosquito brain integrates signals from two of its sensory systems -- visual and olfactory -- to identify, track and hone in on a potential host for her next blood meal.

Their findings, published July 18 in the journal Current Biology, indicate that, when the mosquito's olfactory system detects certain chemical cues, they trigger changes in the mosquito brain that initiate a behavioral response: The mosquito begins to use her visual system to scan her surroundings for specific types of shapes and fly toward them, presumably associating those shapes with potential hosts.

Mosquitoes - Blood - Results - Scientists - Glimpse

Only female mosquitoes feed on blood, and these results give scientists a much-needed glimpse of the sensory-integration process that the mosquito brain uses to locate a host. Scientists can use these findings to help develop new methods for mosquito control and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

This study focused on the olfactory cue that triggers the hunt for a host: carbon dioxide, or CO2. For mosquitoes, smelling CO2 is a telltale sign that a potential meal is nearby.

Breath - CO2 - Author - Jeffrey - Riffell

"Our breath is just loaded with CO2," said corresponding author Jeffrey Riffell, a UW professor of biology. "It's a long-range attractant, which mosquitoes use to locate a potential host that could be more than 100 feet away."

That potential host could be a person or another warm-blooded animal. Prior research by Riffell and his collaborators has shown that smelling CO2 can "prime" the mosquito's visual system to hunt for a host. In this new research, they measure how CO2 triggers precise changes in mosquito flight behavior and visualize how the mosquito brain responds to combinations of olfactory and visual cues.

Team - Data - Mosquitoes

The team collected data from approximately 250 individual mosquitoes...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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