New study reports sea level rise in the Arctic

phys.org | 4/17/2018 | Staff
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Over the past 22 years, sea levels in the Arctic have risen an average of 2.2 millimeters per year. This is the conclusion of a Danish-German research team after evaluating 1.5 billion radar measurements from satellites using specially developed algorithms. The new results have just been published in the scientific magazine Remote Sensing online.

The Arctic oceans are often not included in the global sea level estimation. This is partly due to seasonal changes in the sea-ice cover and insufficient satellite coverage. But a new study now provides this overview by looking at extensive amounts of data volumes over many years.

Arctic - Hotspot - Climate - Change - Professor

"The Arctic is a hotspot of climate change," said professor Florian Seitz of the German Geodetic Research Institute at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

"Due to rising temperatures, the glaciers of Greenland are receding. At the same time sea ice is melting. Every year, billions of liters of meltwater are released into the ocean."

Volumes - Water - Arctic - Sea - Level

The enormous volumes of fresh water released in the Arctic not only raise the sea level, they also have the potential to change the system of global ocean currents—and thus, our climate.

But how fast do sea levels rise? And precisely what effect does this have? To answer these questions scientists require specific measurements over as long a period as possible.

Effort - Researchers - Technical - University - Denmark

In a collaborative effort, researchers from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and from the TUM have now documented sea-level changes in the Arctic over a 22-year period. The new results have just been published in the scientific magazine Remote Sensing.

"Our study is based on altitude measurements from space via altimetry satellites and covers the period from 1991 to 2018. Thus, we have obtained the most complete and precise overview of the sea level changes in the Arctic ocean to date. This...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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