Claim: ‘If Everyone Tripped on Psychedelics, We’d Do More About Climate Change’ – ‘In 1960s & 70s, frequent use of psychedelic drugs coincided with widespread environmental movements’

Climate Depot | 6/27/2019 | Marc Morano
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After taking LSD, Bill stood in his kitchen in Merseyside, England, staring at a large tree. When the tree started to speak to him, Bill only found it strange that the tree didn’t formally introduce itself, he told VICE in 2017.

During the rest of their 15 minute chat, the tree clued Bill into the profound fact that all life on earth—plant, animal, and human—was intimately connected. “It was as if someone was inside my head judging my feelings, my thoughts, and my emotions,” Bill said. “It was also a two-way street, though: I could feel how old he was—he’s obviously been through a lot with the way the earth is and how the town I live in was built up around him.”

Anyone - Psychedelics - LSD - Mushrooms - DMT

Anyone who has tripped—especially outdoors—knows that psychedelics, like LSD, mushrooms, DMT, or mescaline, can provoke sensations of awe and wonder at the natural world. This has been replicated in more formal settings too—in January 2018, scientists from Imperial College London found that psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, led to a significant increase in feelings of connection to nature after just one dose. Seven to 12 months later, that increase persisted.

“Before I enjoyed nature, now I feel part of it. Before I was looking at it as a thing, like TV or a painting…” one person in the study said. “[But now I see] there’s no separation or distinction, you are it.”

Psychedelics - Addiction - Anxiety - Depression - Scope

Psychedelics have been shown to help with addiction, anxiety, and depression. But outside the scope of mental illness, researchers are also asking how they can change personality traits and beliefs. An increase in nature-relatedness has been shown to be a unique predictor of happiness. But it is also associated with the planet’s well-being: There’s a demonstrated link between having a relationship to nature and pro-environmental behavior.

A psychedelically-imposed...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Climate Depot
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