Research reveals exotic quantum states in double-layer graphene

ScienceDaily | 6/25/2019 | Staff
spiderMonkey (Posted by) Level 3
"The findings show that stacking 2D materials together in close proximity generates entirely new physics," said Jia Li, assistant professor of physics at Brown, who initiated this work while a post-doc at Columbia working with Cory Dean, professor of physics, and Jim Hone, professor of mechanical engineering. "In terms of materials engineering, this work shows that these layered systems could be viable in creating new types of electronic devices that take advantage of these new quantum Hall states."

The research is published in the journal Nature Physics.

Hone - Wang - Fong-Jen - Professor - Mechanical

Importantly, says Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, several of these new quantum Hall states "may be useful in making fault-tolerant quantum computers."

The Hall effect emerges when a magnetic field is applied to a conducting material in a perpendicular direction to a current flow. The magnetic field causes the current to deflect, creating a voltage in the transverse direction, called the Hall voltage. The strength of the Hall voltage increases with the strength of the magnetic field. The quantum version of the Hall effect was first discovered in experiments performed in 1980 at low temperatures and strong magnetic fields. The experiments showed that rather than increasing smoothly with magnetic field strength, the Hall voltage increases in step-wise (or quantized) fashion. These steps are integer multiples of fundamental constants of nature and are entirely independent of the physical makeup of the material used in the experiments. The discovery was awarded the 1985 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Years - Researchers - Temperatures - Absolute - Zero

A few years later, researchers working at temperatures near absolute zero and with very strong magnetic fields found new types of quantum Hall states in which the quantum steps in Hall voltage correspond to fractional numbers, hence the name fractional quantum Hall effect. The discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect won another Nobel Prize, in 1998....
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!