Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface

ScienceDaily | 6/19/2019 | Staff
Alenaaa (Posted by) Level 3
The new experiment is an observation of Klein tunneling, a special case of a more ordinary quantum phenomenon. In the quantum world, tunneling allows particles like electrons to pass through a barrier even if they don't have enough energy to actually climb over it. A taller barrier usually makes this harder and lets fewer particles through.

Klein tunneling occurs when the barrier becomes completely transparent, opening up a portal that particles can traverse regardless of the barrier's height. Scientists and engineers from UMD's Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM), the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and the Condensed Matter Theory Center (CMTC), with appointments in UMD's Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, have made the most compelling measurements yet of the effect.

Klein - Tunneling - Effect - Years - Ichiro

"Klein tunneling was originally a relativistic effect, first predicted almost a hundred years ago," says Ichiro Takeuchi, a professor of materials science and engineering (MSE) at UMD and the senior author of the new study. "Until recently, though, you could not observe it."

It was nearly impossible to collect evidence for Klein tunneling where it was first predicted -- the world of high-energy quantum particles moving close to the speed of light. But in the past several decades, scientists have discovered that some of the rules governing fast-moving quantum particles also apply to the comparatively sluggish particles traveling near the surface of some unusual materials.

Material - Researchers - Study - Hexaboride - SmB6

One such material -- which researchers used in the new study -- is samarium hexaboride (SmB6), a substance that becomes a topological insulator at low temperatures. In a normal insulator like wood, rubber or air, electrons are trapped, unable to move even when voltage is applied. Thus, unlike their free-roaming comrades in a metal wire, electrons in an insulator can't conduct a current.

Topological insulators such as SmB6 behave like hybrid materials. At low...
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