Lower risk of Type 1 diabetes seen in children vaccinated against 'stomach flu' virus

ScienceDaily | 6/13/2019 | Staff
hi09 (Posted by) Level 3
But the study also reveals a surprise: Getting fully vaccinated against rotavirus in the first months of life is associated with a lower risk of developing Type 1 diabetes later on.

As a group, children who received all recommended doses of rotavirus vaccine had a 33 percent lower risk than unvaccinated children of getting diagnosed with type 1 diabetes -- a lifelong disease with no known prevention strategies or cure.

Team - University - Michigan - Finding - Health

A team from the University of Michigan made the finding using nationwide health insurance data, and published their results in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study provides strong post-market evidence that the vaccine works. Children vaccinated against rotavirus had a 94 percent lower rate of hospitalization for rotavirus infection, and a 31 percent lower rate of hospitalization for any reason, in the first two months after vaccination. Rotavirus hits infants and toddlers hardest; it can cause diarrhea and vomiting that can lead to dehydration or loss of fluids.

Study - Quarter - American - Children - Rotavirus

Yet the study finds more than a quarter of American children don't get fully vaccinated against rotavirus, and that the rate varies widely across the country. Less than half of children in New England and Pacific states were fully vaccinated. Two-thirds of children in the central part of the country were fully vaccinated.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that infants receive the multi-dose vaccine starting no later than 15 weeks, and finish receiving it before they are eight months old. Infants receive the vaccine in oral drops.

Paper - Authors - Epidemiologist - Mary - AM

The paper's authors, led by epidemiologist Mary A.M. Rogers, Ph.D., caution that they cannot show a cause-and-effect relationship between rotavirus vaccination and Type 1 diabetes risk.

"This is an uncommon condition, so it takes large amounts of data to see any trends across a population," says Rogers, an associate professor in the U-M Department of Internal Medicine. "It will...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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