Large summer 'dead zone' forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring

phys.org | 6/18/2018 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2017/chesapeakebay.jpg

Ecologists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the University of Michigan are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.

"The forecast this year reflects the high levels of precipitation that have been observed across the Bay's watershed," said report co-author Jeremy Testa of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. "The high flows observed this spring, in combination with very high flows late last fall, are expected to result in large volumes of hypoxic and anoxic water."

Bay - Hypoxic - Oxygen - Oxygen - Zones

The bay's hypoxic (low oxygen) and anoxic (no oxygen) zones are caused by excess nutrient pollution, primarily from agriculture and wastewater. The excess nutrients stimulate an overgrowth of algae, which then sinks and decomposes in the water. The resulting low oxygen levels are insufficient to support most marine life and habitats in near-bottom waters, threatening the bay's crabs, oysters and other fisheries.

This summer's Chesapeake Bay hypoxic or "dead zone," an area of low oxygen that can kill fish and other aquatic life, is expected to be about 2.1 cubic miles, while the volume of water with no oxygen is predicted to be between 0.49 and 0.63 cubic miles during early and late summer.

Volumes - Zone - Summer - Years - Measurements

The predicted volumes are larger than the dead zone observed during the summer of 2018 and would be among the four largest in the past 20 years. Measurements of the Chesapeake Bay's dead zone go back to 1950, and the 30-year mean maximum dead zone volume is 1.74 cubic miles.

"The forecast is not surprising considering the near-record high flows in 2018 that have continued into 2019," said Bruce Michael, director of the Resource Assessment Service at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. "That said, bottom dissolved oxygen concentrations are improving over...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!