Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light

phys.org | 3/6/2019 | Staff
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Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. The approach, published in the journal Applied Physics Express, improves on current photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques and could lead to energy savings for mass producers, and thus consumers, of power devices.

Semiconducting crystals are used to make electronic devices like microprocessor chips and transistors. Manufacturers need to be able to detect crystal defects and test their energy conversion efficiency. One way to do this is to measure their 'internal quantum efficiency', or their ability to generate photons from electrons excited by an electric current or an excitation laser. Currently available methods limit the sample size that can be tested at a time.

Materials - Kazunobu - Kojima - Tohoku - University

Advanced materials scientist Kazunobu Kojima of Tohoku University and colleagues devised a modified approach to photoluminescence spectroscopy that can test larger samples.

Standard photoluminescence spectroscopy detects the relative amount of light emitted by a semiconductor crystal when an excitation laser is shone on it. Light energy is lost through these excitation and emission processes, so scientists have been experimenting...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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