Research sheds new light on how brain stem cells are activated

ScienceDaily | 6/6/2019 | Staff
gracey (Posted by) Level 3
Now research led by the University of Plymouth helps to shed new light on the mechanisms used by NSCs to 'wake up' -- going from their usual dormant state to one of action.

NSCs produce neurons (nerve cells) and surrounding glial cells in the brain. By understanding how NSCs work, it could pave the way for therapies to speed up the neurons' and glial cells' regeneration.

Study - Drosophila - Fruit - Flies - Molecules

The new study, conducted using Drosophila fruit flies, shows that molecules that form a complex called STRIPAK are essential to promote reactivation in NSCs. STRIPAK (Striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase) is found in organisms from fungi to humans, and the team uncovered it when comparing the genetic messages of dormant and reactivated NSCs in live fly brains.

The researchers then discovered that STRIPAK components act as a switch to turn off dormancy (or quiescence) and turn on reactivation.

Author - Dr - Claudia - Barros - Institute

Lead author Dr Claudia Barros, from the Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine at the University of Plymouth, acknowledges there is still a long way to go until such findings can be translated into human treatments. But she explains the significance of the new work:

"So little is currently known about how neural stem...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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