Australian man found unconscious on Everest after ten climbers died on mountain in just nine days

Mail Online | 5/27/2019 | Zoe Zaczek For Daily Mail Australia;Terri-ann Williams;Isabella Nikolic;Harry Howard For Mailonline
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An Australian climber is fighting for life after he was found unconscious on Mount Everest - where ten climbers have died in nine days.

The man was rescued at an altitude of 7,500 metres, on the northern slopes, about 7pm on Wednesday, according to China Daily.

Crew - Members - Tibet - Himalaya - Expedition

Four crew members from the Tibet Himalaya Expedition Company brought the unidentified man down part of the mountain Wednesday evening.

He was reportedly unconscious and in a critical condition.

Thursday - Morning - Climber - Base - Camp

By Thursday morning, the climber had been taken to Base Camp where he was then transported to hospital.

A spokeswoman from The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said they are 'providing consular assistance to an Australian man hospitalised in Kathmandu' in a statement to Daily Mail Australia.

Privacy - Reasons - Details

'For privacy reasons we are unable to provide further details,' they said.

The Australian climber has reportedly stabilised.

News - Climbers - Everest - Days - Locals

The news comes after ten climbers died on Everest in nine days, with locals blaming clogged up routes for the death toll.

Climbers waiting in queues while climbing are sucking up mountaineers' limited oxygen supply and exposing them to the harsher winds for longer.

Officials - Deaths - Weakness - Exhaustion - Delays

Hiking officials attributed most of the deaths to weakness, exhaustion and delays on the crowded route to the 29,030-foot (8,850-metre) summit.

British climber Robin Haynes Fisher, 44, died in the 'death zone' - known for low oxygen levels - on his descent on Saturday after speaking of his worries about overcrowding on the world's highest mountain.

Media - Posts

In one of his last social media posts, he told...
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