Claude Barras’ ‘Sauvages’ Pitches Potential Partners at Cannes Film Market

Variety | 5/22/2019 | Jamie Lang
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Claude Barras, director of the breakout Academy Award nominated hit “My Life as a Zucchini,” is returning to stop motion animation for his next feature “Sauvages,” a socially conscious tale set in the jungles of Borneo. Producer Rhea Plangg attended this year’s Cannes Film Market to foster negotiations with potential production partners.

“Sauvages,” a working title which translates to “Wild” in English, follows an 11-year-old, half-indigenous girl who heads deep into the Borneo forests. There, under the watchful eye of her grandfather and with the help of a young European and his veterinarian father, the girl commits to protecting an orphaned orangutan from poachers. Issues of heritage, preservation, the importance of biodiversity and family are all touched on with a sensibility that young audiences can embrace.

Importance - Conservation - Protection - Production - Film

More than just onscreen, the importance of conservation and protection is being embraced by the entire production, and the film’s practical effects are being produced using sustainable materials whenever possible.

Despite the overwhelming critical, award and festival success of his previous film, including Golden Globe, Bafta and Oscar nominations as well as scoring the Audience Award and Cristal for best feature at Annecy, Barras and the team working on “Sauvages” are not content to simply do what they’ve done before.

Plangg - Sauvages - Audience - Auteur - Cinema

According to Plangg, “Sauvages’ will speak not only to the audience of auteur cinema, but to a much wider public. “We are targeting a large family audience and kids six and up,” she told Variety in a conversation during the Cannes Film Market.

“This new movie comes directly from my childhood memories,” Barras said of the story’s origins. “I grew up in a family of mountain farmers who switched from traditional agriculture to industrial production. In just a few years, we’ve gone from hand weeding to 18 chemical sprays a year. It shocked me a lot.”

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(Excerpt) Read more at: Variety
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