Ancient toy inspires tool for state-of-the-art science

phys.org | 8/8/2018 | Staff
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A 5,000-year-old toy still enjoyed by kids today has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered scientific tool that could not only impact how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments.

The device, a portable centrifuge for preparing scientific samples including DNA, is reported May 21 in the journal PLOS Biology. The co-first author of the paper is Gaurav Byagathvalli, a senior at Lambert High School in Georgia. His colleagues are M. Saad Bhamla, an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology; Soham Sinha, a Georgia Tech undergraduate; Janet Standeven, Byagathvalli's biology teacher at Lambert; and Aaron F. Pomerantz, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

Paper - Years - Team - Bhamla - Assistant

"I am exceptionally proud of this paper and will remember it 10, 20, 30 years from now because of the uniquely diverse team we put together," said Bhamla, who is an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Together the team demonstrated the device, dubbed the 3-D-Fuge because it is created through 3-D printing, in two separate applications. In a rainforest in Peru the 3-D-Fuge was an integral part of a "lab in a backpack" used to identify four previously-unknown plants and insects by sequencing their DNA. Back in the United States, a slightly different design enabled a new approach to creating living bacterial sensors for the potential detection of disease. That work was conducted at Lambert High School for a synthetic biology competition.

Thanks - Media - Preprint - PLOS - Biology

Thanks to social media and a preprint of the PLOS Biology paper on BioRxiv, the 3-D-Fuge has already generated interest from around the world, including emails from high-school teachers in Zambia and Kenya. "It's awesome to see research not just remain isolated to one location but see it spread," said Byagathvalli. "Through this, we've realized how...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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