Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

ScienceDaily | 5/17/2019 | Staff
bluelilly (Posted by) Level 3
The study, led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in collaboration with Uninettuno Telematic International University in Italy, found that in some cases this is characterised by a lack of problem solving and high avoidance coping strategies. For example, drinking alcohol when having a problem, experiencing very frequent negative emotions, such as anger, fear and sadness, and high work 'moral disengagement', which refers to the way individuals rationalise their actions and absolve themselves of responsibility for the consequences.

Bullying is one of the major occupational stresses for employees and the effects can compromise their development and health, as well as interfere with the achievement of both personal and professional goals.

Bullying - Refers - Workload - Example - Removing

It is usually differentiated as work-related and personal-related bullying. The former refers to bullying affecting workload -- for example removing responsibility -- and work processes, such as attacks on someone's professional status. The latter refers to both indirect -- for example exclusion and isolation -- and direct negative behaviour, such as physical abuse.

While previous research has shown a link between being the target of bullying and behavioral problems, for the first time this study identified different configurations of victims by considering not only exposure to and types of bullying, but also health problems and bad behaviour.

Study - Groups - Terms - Emotions - Relation

The study also examined how these groups differ in terms of negative emotions experienced in relation to work, coping strategies, and moral disengagement.

Published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the study was led by Dr Roberta Fida, a senior lecturer in work psychology at UEA's Norwich Business School. She said: "Overall, our results show the need to consider not only exposure to and types of bullying but also their associated consequences. In particular, the findings highlight that victimisation is associated not only with health problems but also with a greater likelihood of not behaving in...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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