This stellar Crab Nebula image is the perfect way to celebrate Hubble's birthday

Popular Science | 4/24/1990 | Staff
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The Hubble Space Telescope gave us a gift for its 29th birthday: This image of the Southern Crab Nebula. Located over 6,800 light-years from Earth, the hourglass-shaped formation of gas and dust—also known as Hen 2-104—was formed by two aging stars locked in a cosmic do-si-do in the constellation Centaurus.

The two swirling objects make up a binary star system, and they’re at very different stages in their lives. One is a white dwarf: A small, burnt-out core of a star that’s one of the densest objects in the universe (a spoonful of its matter would weigh as much as a truck). The other is a red giant: a bloated, cooled-down star that’s stopped burning hydrogen and started burning...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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