Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes

ScienceDaily | 4/15/2019 | Staff
Explicit attitudes are those that people consciously endorse and, based on other research, are often influenced by concerns about social desirability and presenting oneself in the most positive light. By contrast, implicit attitudes -- which were the focus of this investigation -- reflect people's split-second gut-level reactions that something is inherently good or bad.

"These cultural messages appeared to augment women's gut-level feeling that 'thin' is good and 'fat' is bad," says Jennifer Bartz, one of the authors of the study. "These media messages can leave a private trace in peoples' minds."

Research - Personality - Social - Psychology - Bulletin

The research is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, a journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Bartz and her colleagues obtained data from Project Implicit of participants who completed the online Weight Implicit Association Test from 2004 to 2015. The team selected 20 celebrity fat-shaming events that were noted in the popular media, including Tyra Banks being shamed for her body in 2007 while wearing a bathing suit on vacation and Kourtney Kardashian being fat-shamed by her husband for not losing her post-pregnancy baby weight quickly enough...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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