Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

phys.org | 4/9/2019 | Staff
Goobee (Posted by) Level 4
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2019/everydayenzy.jpg

The jeans you wear, the orange juice you drink, the laundry detergent you use: None would be possible without the activity of enzymes. Currently the enzymes used in industry are produced through an expensive, laborious process, requiring cold storage. But an innovative new approach, ushered in by research from Penn's School of Dental Medicine, is opening up a whole new way of making these valuable proteins.

Two new studies, led by Penn Dental Medicine biochemist Henry Daniell, reveal that enzymes grown in plants can be as effective as the traditional microbial-derived enzyme at accomplishing a number of industrial tasks, from clearing orange pulp from juicing equipment, cleaning laundry stains, removing dye from textiles, or de-pilling fabric. Such plant-grown enzymes have the added benefit of being cheaper to produce and shelf-stable in a powdered form, requiring no refrigeration.

Enzymes - Processes - Stages - Microbial - Products

"Some of our enzymes are even more efficient than the current processes because you avoid all the stages that are required to process the microbial products: fermentation, purification, and cold storage and transportation," says Daniell. "I am excited to have pioneered the production of technology that is part of everyday activities, and can make a major difference in affordability."

The technology has led to the launch of Phyllozyme, a startup company that now occupies lab space at the Pennovation Center, an incubating environment that is home to about 350 innovators at the University's Pennovation Works development.

Study - Researchers - Penn - Technique - Enzymes

In the first study, researchers from Penn used this technique to produce five new plant-derived enzymes, and compared them to 15 other commercial enzyme products that are now derived from microbes, usually yeast. All are commonly used in the textile industry. Many are used in detergents; enzymes such as lipase and mannanase can break down the complex molecules that are present in stains, such as oils, chocolate, and juice. Other enzymes...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Tagged:
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!