Researchers boost intensity of nanowire LEDs

ScienceDaily | 3/21/2019 | Staff
jolan (Posted by) Level 3
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Ultraviolet LEDs are used in a growing number of applications such as polymer curing, water purification and medical disinfection. Micro-LEDs are also of interest for visual displays. NIST staff are experimenting with nanowire-based LEDs for scanning-probe tips intended for electronics and biology applications.

The new, brighter LEDs are an outcome of NIST's expertise in making high-quality gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires. Lately, researchers have been experimenting with nanowire cores made of silicon-doped GaN, which has extra electrons, surrounded by shells made of magnesium-doped GaN, which has a surplus of "holes" for missing electrons. When an electron and a hole combine, energy is released as light, a process known as electroluminescence.

NIST - Group - LEDs - Electrons - Shell

The NIST group previously demonstrated LEDs that produced light attributed to electrons injected into the shell layer to recombine with holes. The new LEDs have a tiny bit of aluminum added to the shell layer, which reduces losses from electron overflow and light reabsorption.

As described in the journal Nanotechnology, the brighter LEDs are fabricated from nanowires with a so-called "p-i-n" structure, a tri-layer design that injects electrons and holes into the nanowire. The addition of aluminum to the shell helps confine electrons to the nanowire core, boosting the electroluminescence fivefold.

"The...
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