NIST researchers boost intensity of nanowire LEDs

phys.org | 3/21/2019 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2019/nistresearch.jpg

Nanowire gurus at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that, thanks to a special type of shell, produce five times higher light intensity than do comparable LEDs based on a simpler shell design.

Ultraviolet LEDs are used in a growing number of applications such as polymer curing, water purification and medical disinfection. Micro-LEDs are also of interest for visual displays. NIST staff are experimenting with nanowire-based LEDs for scanning-probe tips intended for electronics and biology applications.

LEDs - Outcome - NIST - Expertise - Gallium

The new, brighter LEDs are an outcome of NIST's expertise in making high-quality gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires. Lately, researchers have been experimenting with nanowire cores made of silicon-doped GaN, which has extra electrons, surrounded by shells made of magnesium-doped GaN, which has a surplus of "holes" for missing electrons. When an electron and a hole combine, energy is released as light, a process known as electroluminescence.

The NIST group previously demonstrated LEDs that produced light attributed to electrons injected into the shell layer to recombine with holes. The new LEDs have a tiny bit of aluminum added to the shell layer, which reduces losses from electron overflow and light reabsorption.

Journal - Nanotechnology - Brighter - LEDs - Nanowires

As described in the journal Nanotechnology, the brighter LEDs are fabricated from nanowires with a so-called "p-i-n" structure, a tri-layer design that injects electrons and holes into the nanowire. The addition of...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Woof!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!